frances lerner

 

My current work both abandons and embraces premises of the two previous series shown in the last six years - (There Was Once A World and Sympathetic Criminals) - which took for inspiration a perplexed puppet named Lorelei. The puppet, her family, and her compadres in industrial dioramas formed a traditional still life set up. In much of this work, the process of painting was reactionary, old fashioned, reviving the old masters’ techniques. Observation and a constrained set of steps – an underpainting, thin glazes - were key.

Initially, in the current work, my usual small scale wooden panels became even smaller to deal with larger, lofty themes like mortality, creating an irony and ambivalent spatial relationships reigned.

But, consciously, I wanted to find a woman’s narrative story as a basis and I settled on the 1911 Manhattan Triangle Factory Fire (where 146 immigrant women died.) I bought a very old bellows, drawn by the way it operated, feeding the fire with air. The bellow’s rounded petal and angular shapes (similar in some ways to misshapen Lorelei) were what I loved. But, rather than doing a painting of the object, my impulse was to pull the actual bellows apart. But, it couldn’t be put be put back together again. The individual shapes united and reunited forming a sort of hybrid form that felt both familiar and mysterious, balanced and imbalanced. More bellows followed.

Instead of technical constraints serving as a guide and only using oil paint on panel, multiple techniques and materials accrued to these hybrid sculptures: Odd bedfellows -cast concrete and homespun fabric, wood and wool, bound physically to each other and reacted together unexpectedly. They formed a kind of old world symbiosis where the materials hold memory.

As my painting was no longer based on observation, each one could be described as a fragment or a footnote to something once there and then gone, with one foot in our reality and the other in the other world. Oddly, in some sense one could imagine the painting spawning, the hybrid sculptures; or the objects escaping their trap spilling into actual space --- Some of the paintings and objects coupled off creating a third meaning, sometimes they changed partners.

Finally, this body of work strives to be inclusive on many levels, in subject, process, materials, and in person.

There Was Once a World

The central characters I use in my small paintings are based on a Lorelei, a Japanese puppet I bought at a flea market and her French puppet husband. Later, I bought their child on eBay -- a diminutive creature with the same spout mouth. The completed family became a metaphorical tool I use to stage allegorical human stories. The characters’ imaginary settings include pastoral landscapes and industrial sites constructed from combinations of old junkyard machinery parts, photographs and stills from You Tube factory videos.

Simultaneously old-fashioned and contemporary, naive and sophisticated, my content and painting style are intentionally at odds. Rejecting certain aspects of Modern Art and Post Modernism, the expressive brushwork of Abstract Expressionism and a focus on surface over illusion for example, I’ve purposefully painted in an earnest, restrained and understated way. Deliberately, I’ve resurrected some Old Master’s academic techniques which include thin layers of delicate glazes and body color over a black and white grisaille, chiaroscuro (though off-kilter) atmospheric perspective, and in some, a modified Flemish palette. Thus, in both content and technique I am striving to combine the folksy and the classical.

Part puppet/part human, Lorelei could be every peasant, immigrant, orphan or artist in every sweatshop, factory, studio, or day job, in Poland, or Russia, or an industrial city like Cleveland, my hometown, in its faded glory of down-trodden industrial buildings full of pipes and machines, the uses of which are mysterious. Lorelei is my metaphor for perplexity, paradox and a woman’s predicament. In context, she symbolizes the conflict between reverie and creativity on the one hand, and secular practicality, the tasks and work of this world on the other.

Themes of “there for but the grace of God go I” and “the meek shall inherit the earth” are underpinning of this series. But the primary goals are to create an ironic nostalgia and reinstate genuine pathos and tenderness.

Minor Characters and Sympathetic Criminals

My current body of work continues the themes of “There for but the grace of God go I” and “the meek shall inherit the earth” that was begun in There Was Once a World.

But now the main character, a puppet named Lorelei, is just one among the many strugglers depicted, - among weavers, workers, pickpockets, policemen, idlers, and occupiers. Lorelei and the others are pinned into their architecture, their circumstances figuratively and literally. They get by, though barely, in some mysterious space where narrative and abstraction meet. Sometimes the architecture looms over them like a reminding metaphor or becomes the character itself.

Still employing the traditional old master oil painting techniques that were present in the
previous work, the color palette has now lowered and deepened a few octaves, with more attention to color interaction. The process involves establishing a form, then seeking out
the actual concrete piece in the world. This series can be seen as reflecting a more solemn time, both publicaly and personally.

I plan to expand on my previous themes of characters at work, to create a series of paintings of both the energy of work and the sad idleness of empty architecture. I will continue using puppets for stand-ins, bulding sets for metaphoric architecture to use as triggers. Combining old master techniques but with ramshackle content I will try to re-invent notion of Still and Not So Still Lives from the characters in the studio warehouse complex called the Giant Trade Center in San Pablo and have it open as an off-site exhibition.